Skip to main content

Million Hearts® / Cardiovascular Health Improvement

Top

Million Hearts® Resources

HSAG has compiled several crucial cardiac-related resources and tools below, including those provided by the Million Hearts® initiative. In particular, to allow easy access to the most current Million Hearts materials, HSAG has embedded its microsite, which will open into a separate window. Click on this link microsite or the image below to access it. 

MHmicrosite

2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults

The Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) released its 2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults.

View Resource

30 Minute Office Blood Pressure Monitoring in Primary Care

A study published in the Annals of Family Medicine (March/April 2017) found that automated office blood pressure monitoring for 30 minutes in the clinic may dramatically lower the risk of for “white-coat” hypertension and related overtreatment of patients. Read more at the journal article.

View Resource

A Sign of Below Average IQ

Researchers found that smokers’ IQ was a full 7 points lower than the general population average 100 IQ-point score. Those who smoked more than a pack a day had IQs around 90. The study included 20,000+ men before and after their time in the Israeli military. According to one of study...

View Resource

A 'Sweet Spot' for Heart Health

The European Heart Journal published a study concerning obesity, discovering that the lowest risk for cardiovascular disease was tied to a body mass index (BMI) between 22 and 23. The study involved 300,000 healthy men and women between the ages of 40 and 69, who were tracked for an average of...

View Resource

AHA Blood Pressure Guidelines 2017

The latest guidelines issued from the American Heart Association (AHA) categorize an added 30 million Americans with high blood pressure. People with readings of 130 as the top number or 80 as the bottom number are now considered to have high blood pressure, according to the new guideline issued by...

View Resource

AHA Cardiac Disease Prevention Guidelines

The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology released four new guidelines in 2013 dealing with the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

View Resource

AHA Enduring Webinar: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Hypertension: Beginning the Conversation

The American Heart Association (AHA) presents, as part of its professional education Spotlight Series, "Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Hypertension: Beginning the Conversation." Using case studies, this webinar identifies opportunities where clinicians can provide better management of...

View Resource

AHA Heart Risk Tool Overstates Risk

The most influential American Heart Association (AHA) calculator of the risk of having a heart attack or stroke overstimates the likelihood of those events by 500 percent or more, according to a recent Kaiser study. Many physicians use the tool , meaning that many people may have been needlessly...

View Resource

Alzheimer’s Protein Plaques May Also Harm the Heart

The amyloid beta plaques present in Alzheimer’s patients may also be involved in stiffening heart muscle tissue, spiking their risk of heart failure. This U.S. News & World report article summarizes the findings of a small study of people in their late 70s, involving those who were healthy and...

View Resource

American Heart Association Video Library

The American Heart Association has compiled patient-friendly videos on high blood pressure and stroke.

View Resource

An Aspirin a Day for Heart Health? It May Depend on Your Weight

A common prescription for heart disease prevention is baby aspirin. According to a study in The Lancet, data from 10 randomized trials determined that the size of the dose and the weight of the patient significantly influences the clinical outcome. For people who weighed less than 154 pounds, the...

View Resource

As Menopause Symptoms Get Worse, Heart May Pay a Price

In a study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, researchers found that as menopausal symptom severity increased, so too did artery stiffening and disfunction of blood vessels, along with lower quality of life. Investigators tracked outcomes for 138 menopausal women to compare mood,...

View Resource

Aspirin at Night Is More Potective Against Myocardial Infarction or Stroke

A USAToday news article summarizes the findings of researchers who monitored the platelet activity of patients taking a low-dose aspirin at night versus upon awakening, who found the nightly ritual more beneficial.

View Resource

Blood Cholesterol Management Guideline

This guideline, released by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association on November 10, 2018, includes quick references, apps and tools, slides, and patient resources.

View Resource

Blood Pressure Management

The New England Journal of Medicine has produced a clinical training video demonstrating the proper blood pressure measurement protocol.

View Resource

Blood Pressure Measurement Technique

Download this guide on proper blood pressure measurement technique in English or Spanish prepared from the American Medical Association and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

View Resource

Blood Pressure Tracker

Health Services Advisory Group (HSAG) has created this tri-fold brochure to enhance convenience for your patients to keep track of their blood pressure readings.

View Resource

Blood Test for Hidden Heart Disease in Men

Researchers from Edinburgh and Glasgow have found that men with higher levels of troponin in their blood were more likely to have a heart attack or die of heart disease up to 15 years later. The 3,300 men enrolled in the study had no prior history of heart disease, but had high cholesterol. The...

View Resource

Calcium Supplements May Not Be Heart Healthy

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have published a study suggesting that dietary calcium supplements—not calcium-rich foods— might harm the heart. That is, excess calcium may harm the heart and vascular system. Given that nearly 43 percent of U.S. adults take a supplement...

View Resource

Cardiac - Blood Pressure Control Plan-Do-Study-Act

Health Services Advisory Group (HSAG) has created this one-sheet handout designed to explain how to build a Plan-Do-Study-Act plan regarding blood pressure control in your practice.

View Resource

Cardiac - Smoking Cessation Plan-Do-Study-Act

Health Services Advisory Group (HSAG) has created this one-sheet handout to describe how to build a Plan-Do-Study-Act plan regarding smoking cessation in your practice.

View Resource

Cardiac Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation (podcast)

Dr. Bradley Knight, medical director of Electrophysiology and Electrocardiography at the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, discusses cardiac ablation.

View Resource

Cardiac Immunization Mini Toolkit

Use Health Services Advisory group's Cardiac Immunization Mini Toolkit to apply best practices for better cardiac outcomes.

View Resource

Cardiac Rehabilitation Continuing Education

The American College of Cardiology is offering 15 no-cost continuing education (CE) modules (1 hour each) on cardiac rehabilitation (launched 9/28/18), but non-members will need to create a no-cost online account to access the courses.

View Resource

Cardiac Testing for Slight Acute Coronary Syndrome Risk Just Means More Procedures

Routine testing in the emergency department (ED) for patients reporting chest pain and no evidence of ischemia provided no clinical benefits, according to a Stanford University study published on June 26, 2017 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The investigators concluded that cardiovascular testing within...

View Resource

Cardiovascular Disease Patients Need Depression Screening and Management

According to the most recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) State-of-the-Art Review, patients with cardiovascular disease should undergo screening to identify and manage depression. The risk of depression among those with cardiovascular disease numbers 1 in 5. The statement...

View Resource

Cardiovascular Part 1 Best Practice Intervention Package (BPIP)

An updated version of the BPIP has been released to align with the new blood pressure guidelines (from November 2017). Visit the Cardiovascular Health BPIP site to download the new package: http://www.homehealthquality.org/Cardiovascular-Health/Best-Practices.aspx.

View Resource

Cholesterol and Statins Infographic

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has created an infographic on cholesterol and statins, educating viewers on the role of cholesterol and how to keep it in check.

View Resource

Cholesterol Guide

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration Office of Women’s Health developed a guide to help patients talk to their doctors, pharmacists, or nurses about how to best control cholesterol. This guide lists the different kinds of medicines to control cholesterol. Patients are advised to ask their...

View Resource

Cholesterol Resources

Learn about cholesterol and get the resources necessary to prevent or treat high cholesterol at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention website. For resources directed exclusively to healthcare workers, visit the American Heart Association to obtain its cholesterol toolkit.

View Resource

Cholesterol Resources for Professionals

The American Heart Association (AHA) has assembled a toolkit for physicians to tap, including a pocket guide on how to initiate a conversation with patients on cholesterol management, along with guidelines for treating high cholesterol. The AHA also offers downloadable materials such as a referral pad for guiding patients to join Heart360, a waiting room poster, and a quick start guide.

View Resource

CMS Finalizes Changes to Comprehensive Care Joint Replacement Payment Model

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized changes to the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model, while it also canceled the Episode Payment Models and Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive Payment Model. Read more at the CMS newsroom website.

View Resource

Counseling Can Help Prevent CVD in Low-, Average-Risk Adults

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) published its final recommendation and evidence summary on July 11, 2017, confirming its draft recommendation that doctors who care for adults with low or average risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) should consider offering or referring them to...

View Resource

CV Event Prediction, Risk Assessment in Type 2 Diabetes

Investigators have found that using a Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Risk Score for Secondary Prevention (TRS 2°P) is a reliable predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the randomized clinical trial, SAVOR-TIMI 53, of more than 16,000 patients randomly...

View Resource

Daily Alcohol Consumption Raises Stroke Risk

According to a research study published in The Lancet, drinking one serving of alcohol per day raises the risk of a stroke by 10 to 15 percent. Consuming four drinks per day raises the risk of stroke to 35%. A single serving was defined as a small glass of wine, a bottle of beer, or a single...

View Resource

Daily Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks No Longer Recommended for Older Adults

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that for adults ages 50 to 59, with the following risks should take daily low-dose aspirin: who are at 10 percent or greater 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease not at increased risk of bleeding with a...

View Resource

Daily Exercise May Halve Risk for Heart Failure

Most studies have dealt with the relationship between exercise and heart disease. This unique study addressed exercise and heart failure. This is a Swedish study which looked at 40,000 patients, starting in 1997, who did not have heart failure at study onset. Published in Circulation: Heart Failure...

View Resource

Developmental Cause of Cardiac Hypertrophy Discovered

Adult onset of cardiac hypertrophy—a dangerous thickening of the heart muscle that can result in heart failure and death—now has been revealed to have genetic mutations as its cause, according to researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Signaling pathways responsible for heart cell...

View Resource

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)

DASH is a flexible and balanced eating plan that helps creates a heart-healthy eating style for life.

View Resource

Dietary Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have released the latest dietary guidelines to the American public. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines provide a path for all interested parties to make healthier eating choices founded on evidence-based findings.

View Resource

Disruptive Sleep Patterns Could Raise Heart Disease Risk

A study published in the American Heart Association’s journal, Hypertension, discovered that people who lack adequate sleep or experience disordered sleep cycles may be increasing their chances of developing cardiovascular disease. Those at particular risk include shift workers.

View Resource

Do Social Ties Affect Our Health?

This National Institutes of Health (NIH) News in Health article discusses studies showing a correlation between social relationships and stress reduction and low heart-related risks.

View Resource

Dog Ownership Associated with Improved Heart Health

In a study of 3.4 million adults ages 40 to 80 in Sweden, researchers found that dog owners had a 33 percent lower risk of death and an 11 percent reduced risk of cardiovascular disease as compared to non-dog owners during the 12-year study. The research findings were published in Scientific...

View Resource

Exercise and Vitamin D Support Heart Health

In a Johns Hopkins research study, investigators found that Vitamin D and exercise work better together to support heart health. More than 10,000 health records were examined by these scientists across a span of 20 years. They discovered that exercise correlated positively with Vitamin D levels, so...

View Resource

Exercise Makes the Aging Heart More Youthful

Engaging in exercise throughout your life lends the greatest heart protective benefits, but starting at any time can be helpful, according to University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researchers. A 20-year, multi-arm, long term study of varied exercisers and sedentary people revealed that...

View Resource

Factors That May Lead to Hypertension in Black Adults

A Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) study of more than 30,000 people followed over nine years found Southern diet score, ratio of sodium to potassium intake, and education level each significantly correlated, in descending order, with incidence of hypertension during that time....

View Resource

Familial Hypercholesterolemia Ups Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Research now suggests that patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) bear a dramatic increase in risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). People with FH are more likely to contract ASCVC up to 20 years earlier in men and 30 years...

View Resource

Fat But Fit? The Controversy Continues

This New York Times (NYT) article reports on the latest science regarding obesity and heart disease, suggesting that even people who are metabolically healthy and are only overweight possess a 30 percent higher risk of coronary heart disease than normal weight peers. For more details, read the NYT...

View Resource

FDA Approves First Absorbable Stent for Coronary Artery Disease

On July 5, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System (BVS), the first absorbable stent for coronary artery disease, which releases the drug everolimus to limit the growth of scar tissue and is gradually absorbed by the body in...

View Resource

Gender-Related Disparities in Care and Outcomes After Hospitalization for Coronary Artery Disease Among Older Adults

Based on a cohort study of 49,358 patients ages 65 and older, researchers found that women were less likely to receive optimal care and more likely to have higher mortality if they received suboptimal care. In addition, researchers discovered that blacks were more likely to die than whites...

View Resource

Gene Protects Women from Heart Disease, Study Finds

Researchers from the University of Southern California have detected a gene variant that decreases the risk of heart disease, but only in women. Those who possess the CPS1 gene had a 12 percent decreased risk for heart disease, but offered no protective effect in men. CPS1 has a strong effect in...

View Resource

Google Has Developed a Way to Predict Your Risk of Heart Attack Just by Scanning Your Eye

As published in Nature Biomedical Engineering journal, an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm created by Google AI and Verily Life Sciences (an Alphabet subsidiary that spun off from Google) can predict whether a patient is likely to suffer a major cardiovascular event like a heart attack or...

View Resource

Great American Smokeout

Help celebrate the Great American Smokeout on November 15, 2018! Join Health Services Advisory Group (HSAG) to support the American Cancer Society's (ACS's) Great American Smokeout event by sharing messages and materials among patients, family, and friends to quit smoking. Encourage someone you...

View Resource

Heart Attacks Are Linked to Patients’ Activity Level and Emotional State

A global study involving 52 countries concluded that prior activity and emotional state was linked to patients who experienced heart attacks. Researchers studied more than 12,000 patients who had experienced heart attacks for the first time. Nearly 75 percent of the patients were men, age 58 on...

View Resource

Heart Disease Protein Linked to Brain Damage

Investigators from the Netherlands studied more than 10,000 subjects tracking levels of NT-proBNP, a protein released into the bloodstream when cardiac wall stress occurs. The researchers discovered an association between higher NT-proBNP levels and brain damage (e.g. smaller brain volume, poorer...

View Resource

Heart Failure Therapy Could Prevent Substantial Number of Deaths, Study Finds

A University of California, Los Angeles study estimates that almost 28,500 deaths could be prevented each year in the US through use of a new FDA-approved class of cardiovascular medication ('angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor' [ARNI] therapy) that helps reduce mortality in patients...

View Resource

Heart Health Benefits From Optimistic Thinking, Study Finds

A University of Illinois study of more than 4,900 people of Latino/Hispanic ancestry in the U.S. analyzed cardiac outcome measures while exploring socioeconomic, cultural, and psychosocial influences. Optimism was measured, using the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R), a questionnaire that...

View Resource

Heart-healthy Middle Years Associated With Lower Alzheimer's Disease Risk

Certain risk factors present a higher probability of developing Alzheimer’s Disease later in life. Among these, according to researchers from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (a part of the National Institutes of Health), age poses the strongest risk factor, followed by...

View Resource

Helping Your Heart Lowers Your Risk of Dementia

A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) of more than 6,600 senior citizens conducted across 8.5 years found that for subjects with good cardiovascular health their risk of dementia was dramatically reduced. The researchers relied on the seven metrics of...

View Resource

Hispanics, Blacks Less Likely to Get High Blood Pressure Treatment

In a study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes on January 17, 2017, investigators found that American Americans and Hispanics are less likely than whites to control their blood pressure. The U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reviewed data from 8,800...

View Resource

Home Health Agency Cardiovascular Data Registry Resources

Home Health Quality Improvement has compiled an extensive list of Home Health Cardiovascular Data Registry resources for download as a .pdf.

View Resource

Home Health Cardiovascular Data Registry Guide

Home Health Quality Improvement has released its Home Health Cardiovascular Data Registry User Guide as a Word document.

View Resource

How to Track Your Sodium and Change Your Salty Ways

The American Heart Association (AHA) provides a handy sodium tracker to help people stay within the recommended daily allowance (1,500 mg per day for adults). The AHA has designed a Change Your Salty Ways tip sheet to help people alter their eating habits across six weeks. For an overview, read the...

View Resource

Hypertension Management App

The Ohio Academy of Family Physicians (OAFP) has made available its Hypertension Management App on its site. Through a collaboration of the Ohio Department of Health (ODH), the Ohio Academy Family Physicians, and Park Bench Digital, the Check it. Change it. Control it. Your Heart Depends on It app...

View Resource

Hypertension Prevalence Estimator Tool

The Million Hearts® Hypertension Prevalence Estimator Tool provides the user with a health system’s expected hypertension prevalence, which is the estimated percentage of patients receiving care within the health system who have hypertension. Health systems (including practices) can compare their...

View Resource

Ibuprofen Claimed to Raise Cardiac Arrest Risk by a Third

Researchers have discovered a link between ibuprofen use and heart attacks in a clinical study of 29,000 patients who had experienced cardiac arrest. This Danish clinical study also separately looked at whether patients had taken non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Risk of cardiac...

View Resource

Important Heart Risks Decline for Older Americans

Over a 20 year period, elderly Americans of both genders reduced their risks for heart attack and stroke, according to researchers from the University of Southern California. The study investigators suspect the cause of this positive trend is due to greater use of cholesterol and hypertension drugs...

View Resource

Instant Blood Test for Heart Attacks

Researchers from King’s College in London used a cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyC) test that rules out heart attacks in under 20 minutes. By excluding non-heart attack candidates, hospital beds could be kept available for genuine at-risk patients. The study involved almost 2,000 subjects...

View Resource

Involving Pharmacists in Care Decisions May Reduce Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Canadian researchers discovered that pharmacist intervention in the care of patients lowers the risk for cardiovascular disease, including LDL cholesterol, blood pressure, HbA1c levels, and smoking status.

View Resource

Loneliness Can Actually Hurt Your Heart

The journal Heart investigated social isolation and loneliness finding that people who are isolated or lonely are more likely to have a heart attack or stroke compared to people with string social networks. In addition, mortality risk increases for people with heart disease who are socially...

View Resource

Long Work Days May Be Bad for Your Health

Researchers in Europe studied more than 85,000 men and women for a decade who had no prior record of atrial fibrillation, finding that long working hours increased their risk of the condition. After adjusting for a variety of factors (sex, smoking, obesity, socioeconomic status, diabetes, etc.),...

View Resource

Long-Term Impacts From Wildfire Smoke Suggest Heart and Lung Effects

A University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) pulmonary specialist, John Balmes, MD, reports that the particulates found in carbon-based fuels, such as a forest fire, produce toxic complex hydrocarbons into the air. The human response to such particulates is lung tissue injury, involving...

View Resource

Low Blood Phosphate Levels Suggest Risk to Heart Health

Researchers from the University of Surrey have found that low levels of phosphate in the blood pose cardiac health risk. This finding is at odds with previous topical research. The records of more than 100,000 patients were scrutinized at five- and nine-year junctures while assessing their cardiac...

View Resource

Low Calcium Levels Double the Risk of Sudden Heart Death

Researchers from Cedars-Sinai Institute have found that people with the lowest calcium levels in their blood have double the risk of experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. The scientists believe that by boosting milk or cheese intake, that people can better protect themselves. The results have been...

View Resource

M.A.P. Checklist for Improving Blood Pressure Control

The American Medical Association and Johns Hopkins Medicine have created a tactical checklist to help providers improve BP control among their patients. M.A.P. means measuring accurately, acting rapidly, and partnering with patient, families, and communities to achieve blood pressure control.  To download this document you must set up a free account with AMA.

View Resource

Meal Timing Could Affect Cardiovascular Health

Meal timing matters when it comes to cardiovascular health, as confirmed by researchers at Columbia University. While an exacting prescription is not at hand, researchers have concluded that people should spread out their caloric intake at “defined” periods of the day as opposed to eating a lot for...

View Resource

Measurement of Cholesterol Function Might Provide Link to Heart Attack Risk in Patients with Psoriasis

In a news release from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, among psoriasis patients, conducted by the National Heart and Lung Institute at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), researchers have found that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function is a risk factor for developing...

View Resource

Men's Heart Health: What You Can Do To Improve It

HSAG has prepared a flyer describing how everyone can help improve the heart health of men. This includes medical professionals and lay people alike.

View Resource

Metabolically Healthy People At Higher Risk for Cardiovascular Events Than General Population

Recent research indicates that healthy obese individuals are still at risk for cardiovascular events, such as heart failure or stroke, than people at normal weight. Investigators in the United Kingdom studied people with a body mass index in excess of 30, who lacked metabolic complications linked...

View Resource

Million Hearts® Healthy Eating & Lifestyle Resource Center

The Million Hearts® campaign has created a one-stop shop for heart healthy recipes, meal plans, and tips for healthier cooking.

View Resource

Million Hearts® Badges

Use these web badges on your organizational website to promote the Million Hearts® program.

View Resource

Million Hearts® Cardiac Rehabilitation Change Package

This Cardiac Rehabilitation Change Package was completed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) with the purpose of helping cardiac rehabilitation programs, hospital quality...

View Resource

Million Hearts® Cardiac Rehabilitation Communications Toolkit

This toolkit equips your health system or practice with resources and messages to spread awareness about the value of cardiac rehabilitation and solutions for increasing participation.

View Resource

Million Hearts® Collaboration Focus: Talking with African-American Patients About Heart Health

February is home to both American Heart Month and Black History Month. To celebrate, we’re calling on health professionals to focus on talking with African American patients about their heart health. Why? Because African Americans are disproportionately affected by heart disease and stroke....

View Resource

Million Hearts® Self-Measured Blood Pressure Monitoring Action Steps Infographic

An interactive infographic, from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology and the Million Hearts® campaign, is designed to help healthcare providers learn about self-measured blood pressure (SMBP), the burden of high blood pressure, and the medical and financial...

View Resource

Million Hearts® Toolkit for Providers

The Million Hearts® campaign offers a variety of toolkits for physicians to expand existing heart disease and stroke prevention programs, and to recruit others to improve clinical preventive practice and community prevention.

View Resource

Mitochondrial DNA Could Predict Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death, Heart Disease

A new biomarker concerning mitochondrial DNA is predictive of heart attacks and sudden heart death ten years before they occur. Researchers from Johns Hopkins conducted two studies and published their results in JAMA cardiology on October 11, and in European Heart Journal on June 30, claiming that...

View Resource

Narrative Journaling Showing Promise for Cardiac Health After Divorce

According to a study published in Psychosomatic Medicine (May 8, 2017), University of Arizona researchers found that journaling using a structured framework helps to lower blood pressure. The investigators studied 109 separated or divorced men and women, splitting them into three groups to write...

View Resource

New Opioid Use in Older Adults with COPD Associated with Increased Risk of Cardiac Death

Researchers at St. Michael’s Hospital have found that older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) who has initiated opioid use have a 215 percent higher risk of coronary artery disease-related death as compared to non-opioid users. Prior research indicated that elderly patients...

View Resource

Non-Heart Surgery May Pose Danger to Older Adult Cardiac Health

A study performed by the Cardiovascular Research Institute in Basel, Switzerland confirmed that older patients frequently suffer from heart damage during various surgeries, even from non-heart surgeries, boosting their risk of death. Perioperative myocardial injury (PMI) is a subtle form of injury...

View Resource

Not Just a Man’s Problem: The Deadly Cost of Underestimating Women’s Heart Disease

One in four females in the U.S. die from heart disease each year making it the leading cause of death for women in this country. Women are not treated as aggressively as men following a heart attack. This Health Affairs blog article gives an overview of health inequity by gender and its...

View Resource

Omega 3 Supplements Have Little or No Heart or Vascular Health Benefit

Researchers have accrued new evidence that there is little to no effect of omega 3 supplements on risk of heart disease, stroke, or death. It has been widely promoted that consumption of omega 3 fats, such as those found in fish, because of a common belief that it supports heart health. Researchers...

View Resource

Part D and Low-Income Beneficiaries Not Taking Blood Pressure Meds as Prescribed

Almost five million Medicare prescription drug enrollees aren’t taking their blood pressure (BP) medication as directed, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers examined 18.5 Medicare Part D enrollees in 2014, discovering that 26 percent either...

View Resource

Pay-For-Performance Incentive Program for Small Practices with Electronic Health Records (EHR) Improves Cardiac Outcomes

A study by the University of California, San Francisco, revealed that a pay-for-performance program in EHR-enabled small practices generated modest improvements in cardiovascular care processes and outcomes.

View Resource

Pharmacists Can Improve Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Outcomes in Stroke Patients

Research from the University of Alberta revealed that stroke patients managed by a pharmacist experienced a 12.5% improvement in blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein compared to a control group.

View Resource

Popular Energy Drinks Linked to Cardiac Arrests

Researchers in Australia have discovered that people with Long QT Syndrome —a cardiac disorder—are at risk for heart attacks after drinking Red Bull, a popular energy drink filled with caffeine. The bottom line is that such drinks can alter heart function and heart rhythm. Read more from this ABC...

View Resource

Preventing Myocardial Infarction and Stroke with a Simplified Bundle of Cardioprotective Medications

In the October 2009 issue of the American Journal of Managed Care, researchers led by R. James Dudl, MD, presented their findings on the use of a bundle of cardioprotective medications with simplified delivery and showed that this approach reduced the risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction or stroke among patients at high risk.

View Resource

Proper Blood Pressure Measurement Training Video

Health Services Advisory Group (HSAG) encourages providers to view a training video on proper blood pressure measurement, offered by the Ohio Academy of Family Physicians in partnership with the Ohio Department of Health.

View Resource

Resource for Physicians on Improving Blood Pressure Control

Health Services Advisory Group (HSAG) has created a Resource for Physicians on Improving Blood Pressure Control flyer to assist you in improving blood pressure control in your patients.

View Resource

Sedentary Time May Raise Heart Disease Risk

The American Heart Association has issued scientific statement in the journal Circulation stating that prolonged sedentary time is an independent risk factor for heart disease and stroke. While the AHA pronouncement does not specify exact time parameters to avoid for sedentary behavior, the...

View Resource

Seven Simple Tips to Get an Accurate Blood Pressure Reading

Health Services Advisory Group (HSAG) has created this one-sheet handout that describes seven simple ways to ensure an accurate blood pressure reading.

View Resource

Shared-Decision Making Tool on Statin Choice

The Mayo Clinic has developed a shared-decision making tool regarding statin choice intervention. The goal is to allow providers to use this tool as they walk the patient through their risk factors, likelihood of heart attacks in the next 10 years, and possible interventions to consider given their...

View Resource

Shoulder Problems Linked to Heart Disease Risk

According to a study led by Dr. Kurt Hegmann of the Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of Utah, people who have risk factors for heart disease are several times more likely to have shoulder and rotator cuff issues. More than 1,200 workers across...

View Resource

Six-Minute Test Predictive for Pulmonary Hypertension

According to a study published in the July 28, 2015 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, there is a six-minute walk stress echocardiography test that is predictive of pulmonary hypertension in connective tissue disease. Medicalxpress reports on this findings in its summary...

View Resource

Statins May Up Survival Odds After Cardiac Arrest

The chances of surviving cardiac arrest are increased for patients taking statins—cholesterol-lowering drugs. Investigators from Taiwan studied 138,000 cardiac arrest patients. Survival of hospital admission for cardiac arrest improved by 19 percent for patients taking statins, and by 47 percent to...

View Resource

Stress May Have Greater Effect on Cardiovascular Health in Women Than in Men

Investigators from Emory University have determined that mental stress has a larger impact on peripheral vessels in women than in men, based on a study published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. The study set out to find the extent of stress-induced vasoconstriction. The...

View Resource

Stress, Heart Health, and the Amygdala: Links Explained

Long term stress impacts heart health, but scientists hadn’t understood the physiological mechanisms causing this. New research sheds light on this relationship. One study published in the Lancet investigated whether the resting metabolic activity of the amygdala could predict cardiovascular...

View Resource

Stroke Treatment Saves Lives, Improves Recovery

Stent retriever therapy is a new tactic in the treatment of stroke, as described in the April 2016 issue of the journal Radiology. The study details its use as compared to the standard stroke treatment of tissue plasminogen to remove blood clots.

View Resource

Study Clarifies Risky Decision Making During a Heart Attack

Researchers from the University of Oklahoma discovered that the primary delay factor in determining how quickly acute coronary syndrome patients seek help is numeracy. That is, the ability to understand and apply numerical concepts is undermined during acute coronary episodes. Researchers...

View Resource

Taking Daily Aspirin May Be Risky for Healthy Older Adults: Study

According to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine, consuming an aspiring every day offers limited benefit for healthy older adults. While aspirin has been touted as having heart attack and cancer risk reduction, its side effects —including ulcers and bleeding—may exceed its...

View Resource

Tips for Taking Blood Pressure Medications as Directed

Helping patients control their blood pressure requires use of best practices to maximize their opportunities to do so. Health Services Advisory Group (HSAG) encourages your healthcare team to share these helpful blood pressure videos with your patients from the Million Hearts® initiative: Tips...

View Resource

Trim and Fit? You May Still Have Heart Disease

The author relates a cautionary tale of her sibling whose coronary arteries showed blockage despite living a heart healthy life, being thin, and having cardiovascular numbers within normal range. An echo electrocardiogram (EKG) revealed mild abnormality, and a subsequent angiogram showed 80 percent...

View Resource

Type 2 Diabetes Patients With High CVD Risk, Statin Intolerance Or Ineffectiveness Is Frequent

Among patients with type 2 diabetes with high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, index statin treatment modifications that potentially imply possible statin intolerance and/or ineffectiveness were frequent, according to researchers in this September 2015 British Medical Journal article. Low use of...

View Resource

Undiagnosed Hypertension

The Million Hearts® initiative has created a “Finding Undiagnosed Hypertensive Patients” video. Four essential steps are listed to help providers identify hypertension in their patient pool.

View Resource

Unhealthy Gut Microbes Linked to Cause Hypertension

According to researchers, microorganisms in the intestines were found to be involved in the development of hypertension in rats. A group of hypertensive fats was compared to non-hypertensive rats, and prior to a course of antibiotics, microbiota material was removed from each group. Following the...

View Resource

Why Sudden Cardiac Arrests No Longer Peak in the Morning

The journal Heart Rhythm reports that recent cultural shifts in work schedules and daily stress have influenced the occurrence of sudden cardiac arrests outside the morning period. Read more at the Medical News Today article.

View Resource

Wildfire Smoke Hurts Heart, Not Just Lungs

In the April 2018 edition of the Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA), researchers shared their analysis of the 2015 wildfire season in California which showed that smoke exposure was associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ED visits for all adults, particularly for people...

View Resource

Your Walking Speed May Be Linked to Risk of Heart Disease

Researchers who studied six years’ of data from more than 420,000 middle-aged adults in the United Kingdom discovered that people with a slower walking pace were twice as likely to die from heart disease as those who were fast walkers. In addition, people with low body mass index or those with low...

View Resource

Home